Recently in Lateral Associates Category

Happy New Year and Full Steam Ahead

As we head into 2015, our major law firms are by and large optimistic with respect to their revenue and profitability, and eager to take opportunistic gambles on lateral talent as well as ventures into new markets.   This optimism is tempered however with the still-fresh memories of the brutal financial crisis of 2008 and the unprecedented law firm layoffs that followed, coupled with heightened sensitivity to the reality of the ongoing avalanche of major law firm collapses at a rate of one every year-and-a-half since the year 2000.

As such, while law firm managers are eager to grow strategically, they do so  with heightened due diligence and caution;  no firm wants to be the next Bingham McCutcheon, Dewey & LeBouef, Howrey, Heller Ehrman, Wolf Block, McKee Nelson, Thacher Profit, Thelen, Dreier or Brobeck.  Similarly, no attorney wants to be on board the next Titanic as it starts to sink.

As we enter our fifteenth year in business, Hanover Legal remains constantly vigilant of the health of our major law firms both financially and culturally and prepared to assist our finest attorneys in their efforts to secure spots at those most likely to provide enhanced stability as well as financial and cultural well-being to them going forward, and reciprocally to our finest firms in the increasingly fierce competition for top talent on the lateral attorney market.

We wish all our firm and attorney clients a healthy, happy and prosperous 2015!

37 Signs That Your Firm May Be Sinking

It does not take a legal market expert to know that the landscape of major law firms is changing like that of the polar ice caps. Since 2000 at least nine firms have collapsed from their perches amidst the Am-Flawed 100 directly into oblivion, namely: Dewey & LeBoeuf, Howrey, Heller Ehrman, Thacher Proffitt, McKee Nelson, Wolf Block, Dreier, Thelen, and Brobeck — or on average one firm every one and a half years.

2010 Year End Report

Our long held view that BigLaw is among the most conservatively run and change resistant industries on the planet seems understated in light of the tornedos that we’ve been experiencing of late. That said, 2010 served to raise awareness of issues critical to our long term viability such as globalization, diversification of practices as well as personnel, alternative billing and work-life balance and it appears that by and large, while still far from healthy, BigLaw is a better place to live and work as we enter 2011 than it was a year ago.